Interior Void: a room for collaborative contemplation

image (2)Exploring the tension between surface and substance through a multidisciplinary practice, David Lucien Matheke combines painting, kinetic sculptures, and participatory environments to create silent spaces for collective introspection.

image (9)Invoking ideas of sterility and preservation through works on paper, mixed media sculpture, sound, and performance, Matheke culls inspiration from thinking about ‘the confrontation of mortality’ that haunts and guides a process informed from within.  Whether it be through utilizing the body as source material and subject in his blood paintings or ritualistic installations, Matheke uses the idea of art as a platform for liberating, medium-mixing, and participatory play.

image (4)Contemplating mortality is a subject all too familiar— diagnosed with a rare blood disorder requiring monthly infusions and frequent hospital trips, Matheke sublimates materials like blood and fire as primary mediums to forge an active ‘energy exchange’ with the viewer and as a tool for immortalizing natural ephemera.  Highly influenced from ‘the external: decay; collecting dead insects; feeling other people’s energy; walking around and observing things changing, growing, and ultimately dying,’ Matheke creates ‘surrogate bodies’ through his art, with ghosts frequenting his manifestations.

Opening today, Matheke debuts new works in sculpture, painting and a performance at CSUN Art & Design Center.  On view through 10.18, Interior Void is a thoughtful survey on experiential fields of the elemental, somatic, and subjective— an exhibition translating fascination, fear, abjection, and anxiety into an expressive occasion for interpretation and sovereignty.

 

image (5)image (7)image (1)

10646964_10154712344280347_3750662095959669539_n

David Lucien Matheke: Interior Void 
at CSUN Shed Gallery
opening reception 6-8pm, Tuesday | 10.13 – 10.18.14


—Read more on David and his works in issue no. 7 of The Work Magazine, available December 2014.  All images courtesy the artist.

ISSUE6LOGO

Advertisements

Expanding Cities via New Media

10.3 performance at Sediment Arts | image: Nicki L BA

10.3 performance at Sediment Arts | image: Nicki L BA

A temporary series triangulating multiple cities simultaneously, Expanded Cities hosted telematic events at Sediment Arts in Richmond, Virginia, Mexicali Rose in Mexico, and Curio Studio in Venice, California.

10.4 Suzy Poling x Ian Miyawki at Curio Studio | image: Aaron Farley

10.4 Suzy Poling x Ian Miyawki at Curio Studio | image: Aaron Farley

Commencing for the week on Friday 10.3, Expanded Cities featured a roster of visual and sound artists spanning geographies through a showcase of new media projects.  The LA incantation included performances from local luminaries Devin Sarno, Suzy Poling, and Elle Mehrmand.

10.10 performance at Mexicali Rose | image: Aaron Farley

10.10 performance at Mexicali Rose | image: Aaron Farley

For the closing program on Friday 10.10, visual residues from Virginia-based musician Karacell’s performance were live broadcast from Sediment Arts at 10:30pm EST, syndicated with Randy Randall’s performance at Mexicali Rose, while multidisciplinary artist Elle Mehrmand performed within the saturated lights of Curio’s Venice storefront at 7:30pm PST.

10.10 Elle Mehrmand at Curio Studio | image: Elle Mehrmand

10.10 Elle Mehrmand at Curio Studio | image: Elle Mehrmand

A collaboration between London-based video, performance and light installation artist, Ela Boyd, and LA-based abstract light photographer Aaron Farley, Expanded Cities is an ephemeral light x space x time installation excavating new landscapes through explorations in new media.

>Expanded Cities website

>more photos via WOAH’s Tumblr

there is something happening above us.

werkartz0

On view through Saturday at DTLA’s 10,000 sq ft. arts complex Wərkärtz is a two-man exhibition provoking questions of time, space, semantics, and the authorship of the viewing experience.  Curated by head artist liaison and Wərkärtz studio resident, Shelley Holcomb, there is nothing happening above us features new site-specific works by LA based artists Jason Burgess and Páll Haukur.  At a cross-section of semiotics, the works of these artists attain an intuitive child-like playfulness through unexpected variations in scale, material, and color, while the substance of their representations exists far beyond.

werkartz15On a horizontal plane suspended just below eye level, lies Jason Burgess’ installation The Grove, a weightless sea of multicolored foam orbs stretching across the interior space.   In slow rotation, The Grove quietly animates the adjacent backdrop of Burgess’ paintings, like extraterrestrial clouds in a hanging garden.  The usual staticity of the typical gallery setting—with work level among four white walls, framing the boxed-in viewer to encounter each work like a mirror— is cleverly eradicated throughout the exhibition.  Like Burgess’ work, Haukur’s freestanding ‘clusters’ incorporating drawing, video, sculpture, and found objects, invite discovery— drawing us up-close and to the floor.  Weaving through the subconscious maze of Haukur’s compositions, lie traces of Aristotle, Baudrillard, and a hand contemplating ‘meening.’

werkartz001Haukur’s constructs are less inert objects than material situations produced from the accumulation of codes activated through an interplay of the personal and the political; the subjective and the objective; the signifier and the signified.  Shifting through perspectives and narrative, I sift through vestiges of references to texts, images, and abjection as I move about the algorithms of Haukur’s mad scientist schematics and Burgess’ floating landscapes.  Here, in the sewage of my own private simulacrum— littered with art school academia, Clement Greenberg, and Hegel— I hear Lacan…”what is repeated, in fact, is always something that occurs…as if by chance.”  Press Release.

there is nothing happening above us
works from Jason Burgess and Páll Haukur | curated by Shelley Holcomb
on view through Saturday, June 21st

werkartz16werkartz11werkartz13

Wərkärtz / Studio / Los Angeles
767 S Alameda, Building 2 #100 | Los Angeles, CA 90021
Map | located in DTLA’s Arts District next to the American Apparel factory

2013: a ⅃ook ᗺack + whoa recap

2014
Numerology.
2+0+1+4=7
The Future.

WOAH bids adieu to MMXIII with a chronological recap of our most whoa-provoking audiovisual moments.  In light of resolutions to cross more trajectories and open more art houses– with 2014 set as a ‘7 Universal Year,’ with the number 7 alluding to greater intellectual and spiritual awakening – there’s hope for much more whoa to come in the new year.  Here’s to the 7 experiences likely to linger with us well beyond MMXIII …

LABookFair13>>LA ART BOOK FAIR presented by Printed Matter at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA.  Printed Matter presented the first-ever LA ART BOOK FAIR in February, housing over 200 international presses, booksellers, antiquarians, artists, and independent publishers for the three-day archival symposium.   Free to the public, the annual LA ART BOOK FAIR features artists’ books, catalogs, monographs, periodicals, and zines from around the globe and is companion to the NY ART BOOK FAIR, held every Fall in NYC.  Attendance all-day, every day is recommended for the LA ART BOOK FAIR 2014 just around the corner: January 31- February 2, 2014 // laartbookfair.net

>>HAPTIC & HOLISTIC STRATA by Hiroaki Umeda at Redcat.  The sold-out  HAPTIC & HOLISTIC STRATA at Redcat in February marked Tokyo-based multi-disciplinary artist Hiroaki Umeda‘s US debut.   A compelling vision of dance as multi-sensory visual installation, Umeda’s tight choreography moved synchronously to strobic projections and sonic glitches.  Within flashing patterns, scrolling videos, and explosive light particles, Umeda’s enveloping world of sound, light and movement somehow sublimated looping vertigo into transcendental equilibrium.

Luciana>>PURO DESEO by Luciana Achugar and Michael Mahalchick at Showbox L.A. Brooklyn-based choreographer Luciana Achugar performed alongside frequent collaborator Michael Mahalchick for the LA premiere of the Bessie Award-winning PURO DESEO at Showbox L.A. in March.  Evoking the occult and supernatural through sound, movement, and a moody eye for the preternatural, Achugar and Mahalchick seamlessly webbed the cavernous black-boxed theatre into an eerie, infinite– and at times nightmarish– vortex of apparitions.  For the first minutes of the performance, the viewer sat blinded in darkness (unexpected, this roughly five minutes felt like eternity), with nothing but faint sounds of bells shifting footless through space… casting the spell for the visceral and durational experience that followed.

>>WASH presented by Machine Projects As part of the Field Guide to LA Architecture series running contingent to The Getty’s PST Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A., Machine Project presented WASH, a site-specific, interactive sound installation in an indoor swimming pool.  Speakers installed above and above water channeled live and recorded sounds from Ing (John Wood and Max Markowitz), with frequencies and harmonies changing based on the viewer’s vantage point. Layers of feedback were continually added to the composition as the installation evolved throughout the afternoon.  Inviting the audience to swim through the aquatic soundscape or observe from an underground ‘viewing room’ the piece offered room for both collective and personal mediation.  Weightlessly floating and diving through underwater arpeggios, WASH, was almost as ‘immersive’ as possible.

>>THE GREY ONES by WIFE at the Downtown Independent.  WIFE is the performance trio born of LA artists Jasmine Albuquerque, Kristen Leahy, and Nina McNeely.  Premiering at TEDxSoCal, and later airing on The Creator’s Project, THE GREY ONES, juxtaposes live projection mapping with synchronized choreography to create a narrative on the evolution of time.  With an original score by Amon Tobin, THE GREY ONES evokes myth, matter, and decay; employing alternate medias to illuminate mystical phenomena and uncover collective truths.  Amazing to be apart of the team responsible for bringing this to the Downtown Independent  in August.  Presented by Phyllis NavidadINSTALL:WeHo, MKL GalleryFruitFlyLife, and WOAH.

>>Goblin: Giallo Live at the Egyptian Theatre. 40 years in the making, Halloween 2013 marked the Italian legends LA debut at the inaugural Beyond Fest.  Goblin’s live set drew from the foreboding, whispering melodies of their acclaimed horror and giallo soundtracks.  With founding members, Massimo Morante and Claudio Simonetti center stage; Suspiria 35mm on the–big–screen; and hosted at the landmark Egyptian Theatre– notorious as the site of Hollywood’s first movie premiere– this was an appropriately hyped event honoring the Maserati of film composers.  Presented by American Cinematheque and Amity, the month-long fest featured screenings, premieres, and music events especially suited to bate and satisfy the tastes of horror, fantasy, and sci-fi fans and nerds everywhere.

>>NUIT NOIRE V presented by Mount Analog A quarterly soiree presented by Highland Park record haven Mount Analog, NUIT NOIRE V welcomed Minimal Wave Founder Veronica Vasicka, duo Beau Wanzer (Mutant Beat Dance) and Elon Katz (White Car) as Streetwalker, Karl O’Connor (Regis) and Juan Mendez (Silent Servant)’s first-last-and-always performance as Sandra Plays Electronics, and the US debut of In Aeternam Vale.  At the risk of sounding like a groupie (because for IAV, I proudly am), I stuttered out ‘thank you’s’ and seized the opportunity for a hug-in-passing from the humbled, single-braided, Laurent Prot.  The magician behind a truly insane labyrinth of sounds, Prot first appeared as IAV in 1983 France.  NUIT NOIRE VI hits the LA underground February 14, make it your valentine and reserve tickets at climbmountanalog.com.

vision | MARCELLA DVSI

Making her US debut at our Double Vision this past Saturday, WOAH profiles Italian-born London-based designer MARCELLA DVSI.

Featured in Double Vision‘s Galerie De L’Absurde/Anti-Fashion Show, a hat from MARCELLA DVSI strolled the catwalk alongside a unique selection of sculptural headpieces by Daniel Brent Nieto and Sarah B. Lund, with model silhouettes complete in looks from Kittinhawk, Omega Collektiv, and Bo Matthew Metz.  The common thread among these varied designers may be the unusual ways they depart from the organic lines of the body to create a heightened form of fantasy.  As in the unusual twisted compositions of MARCELLA DVSI, each of these designers utilizes the physical form as a springboard for abstraction––as a canvas for building volume, evoking eroticism and envisioning the surreal, and as a vehicle in which individual style can be accentuated, refined, and reborn.

MARCELLA DVSI at Galerie De L'Absurde/Anti-Fashion Show // Dress & Photo: Bo Matthew Metz // Model: Michelene Cha

MARCELLA DVSI at Galerie De L’Absurde/Anti-Fashion Show // Dress & Photo: Bo Matthew Metz // Model: Michelene Cha

I first met Marcella in Berlin somewhere in the haze of 2009.  From there, we braved the grays of winter desolation, the nonchalant freedom of life as a foreigner in a foreign land, and quickly solidified an aesthetic love affair through shared tastes in Commes des Garçons, Dark Disco, esoteric objects, and Luis Buñuel.  Thanks to the virtual elasticity of internet-time travel, we have kept watch over each other’s creative evolutions after departing and beginning in new territories many years later.  From the start, I have forever been enthralled with Marcella’s captivating charisma––the intricate artistry and concentration she applies to a dexterous process––holed up in her flat with hands busily perfecting the art of braiding for sometimes weeks on end.  As time has continually matured, I have never ceased to be truly blown away by the latest in her architectural and sophisticated collection for MARCELLA DVSI.

Here in an interview, Marcella sheds light on the artist behind the process and the creator behind those intricately braided masks and delicate armors. One thing you won’t learn below though… is underneath the delicate cloaks and woven headpieces, lies a voice akin to the dark deep tones of Nico.  Back in the Berlin black hole we met in, Marcella was the singer for a band called Motherland––opening for the likes of !!! (Chk Chk Chk).  But only after the band, did MARCELLA DVSI take form.  Multifaceted, Marcella’s talents lie in many hats…

MARCELLA DVSI // Photo: Alberto Rugolotto // Model: Debora Omassi

MARCELLA DVSI // Photo: Alberto Rugolotto

///

What shapes your inspiration? I feel inspired by many things such as a dying leaf on the floor, a William Morris print, film noir, or a church’s spire but nothing is more inspiring to me than the sound of a melancholic piano song… I work best when I am at the extreme ends of my emotions––be they positive or negative––I have no intermediate mood.

MARCELLA DVSI // Photo: Susu Laroche

MARCELLA DVSI // Photo: Susu Laroche

Are there any symbolic words or images you connect with your designs?  Serpents, religion, death, veil, pagan …

What is your preferred environment and method for working?  I work at home because all I need is a small table and some space to cut the fabric before I create the braid. I don’t follow drawings as I prefer to let the pieces shape instinctively. 

Are each of your designs single copies or do you do varied editions for each? Roughly how much time do you need to complete one hat? Each piece is unique. Some pieces can be similar but no two are identical as I do not follow a pattern.   It takes me between 8 and 20 hours to make one hat depending on the size and the complexity of the design.

MARCELLA DVSI // Photo: Susu Laroche

MARCELLA DVSI // Photo: Susu Laroche

Your photos seem to be completely in-tune stylistically with your designs.  How do do you choose your collaborators?  Is there an idea behind your photos and videos or what kind of mood do you hope to inspire with the pieces and images you produce? I first began working with [London-based] photographer Susu Laroche because I always thought her aesthetic was very well suited to my work …  I am interested in new collaborations and seeing how others interpret my garments.  I want other people to feel a spiritual union through interacting with my pieces and from the photos and films I make with them.

\\\

To coincide with the launch of her new collection, Marcella premeires the first in an ongoing video series with new collaborator, T.R.  Watch the atmospheric promotional film III for MARCELLA DVSI below.  Fragile in form and meticulously crafted, Marcella’s headpieces and accessories are available for purchase or commission.  Contact MARCELLA DVSI.

vision | NU SPEED

As part of Double Vision, WOAH presents NU SPEED.

Forevermin // NU SPEED

Forevermin // NU SPEED

Delving into various media, Nu Speed‘s projects conjure transcendent sonic spaces and dark reveries.  With an interest in anagrams, puns, fractals, and nominative determinism, Nu Speed employs literary devices and a taste for the uncanny to expose hidden synchronicities in supernatural patterns and wearable novelties.  The delicate, obsessive contours of her prints and videos render a fractured atlas where the alien, natural, and phenomenal collide into one infinite plane.

69 Pins // NU SPEED

’69’ Pins from NU SPEED for sale at SPACE Mall.

While Nu Speed‘s digital studies reveal the holograms of lenticular photographs––leaving traces of transdimensional ghosts in their path––the ingenuity of her handcrafted ’69’ baby pins lies in their perfect artistry of absurdity.  The eerie drone of her soundtracks evoke hypnotic chase scenes, while her literary pieces under Vitus Hearn offer readers clever sexual advisement, lending word-foreplay so well-played puns morph into rhythmic haiku.

A conundrum of creativity and talent extremity, Nu Speed continues to search for the perfect synthesis to unite her extrasolar media projects.  Pick-up Nu Speed‘s nu-est novel items alongside Rossana Diaz at the SPACE Mall booth in the daylight, and keep watch as her latest video manifestations light up the dark this Saturday 7/27 1PM-12AM at Double Vision.

∞ + time – travel = the future

Recently, I was teleported to a place outside of measurable time and space . . .  a vision of what I can hope the future to be –  where prisms bleed into sharpened infinity and space unfolds into a spectroscopic sea of kaleidoscopic forms – a place comparable only to the illusive visions encountered in dreams, delusions, and maybe LSD.

Nana Ghana defies space and time in her performance as seen through a pair of Future Eyes. Photo: Future Eyes

Nana Ghana defies space and time in her performance as seen through a pair of Future Eyes.
Photo: Future Eyes

But this was a perfect image not conceived through REM, mind-control, or psychedelics.  Instead, what I experienced was optical teleportation everyone can have with a pair of Future Eyes.  The fruition of LA based artist, writer, and inventor Brent Pearson – “Future Eyes” himself – Future Eyes are a line of handcrafted laser-cut crystal glasses that are “eyewear for the soul.”  Upon closer inspection, and confirmation from their maker, the tree of life is delicately visible and replicated on each faceted crystal lens.  These kaleidoscopic frames have acquired a following of believers, users, and future purveyors throughout LA and perhaps even worldwide (since they are made to order online).  In preparation for an upcoming book surveying the various visual manifestations and employments beheld through their vision, Future Eyes hosted a group Fotoshow at one of downtown LA’s newest artist-run, Do-It-Together complexes, The LA Fort.

nstallation by Alec Singer + Alec Rose of Indigo Orangutan. Photo: Sharsten

View of installation by Ariel Rose of Indigo Orangutan. Photo: Sharsten

For the first incarnation of the Fotoshow series, an open call for photos was conducted with each invitation complete with a complimentary pair of Future Eyes.  The result accumulated in the group Fotoshow #1  exhibition, tracing optical excursions and experimentation with Future Eyes vision.   I myself am an avid crystal and diffracted lens junkie, but this crystal is like magic . . . and the obsessive quantity of photos that ensued is evidence of how entranced I was in the ephemeral, prismatic, patterned landscapes they led me through.  Documenting the space and time travel of each participant, a selection of photos taken through Future Eyes hung the walls throughout the event’s ballad of live performances, meditations, and audiovisual stimulations.  The evening’s highlights included a guided solstice meditation led by Maria Calderon, a hypnotic performance by Nana Ghana, visuals by MYSTERR + Torie Zalben, Alec Singer, and a live act from Miss M.E (Meghan Edwards).  In addition to all of that, luminescent textiles lined the pyramidal installation pictured by Ariel Rose of Indigo Orangutan.  Part of an ongoing “creation station” project, Indigo Orangutan‘s Gospel of Genesis is “a communal offering of paints and instruments in order to stimulate imagination and creation,” inviting guests to cozy-up and paint among a sea of saturated fabric and cosmic-clad, stationed artists.

Space-rave clad artist as part of Alec Singer + Alec Rose of Indigo Orangutan's installation. Photo: Kelsey Hart for DUMDUM zine

Artist as part of Ariel Rose of Indigo Orangutan’s installation.
Photo: Kelsey Hart for DUM DUM zine

Each element of the evening seemed to be an invocation inspiring heightened sensory awareness, with the collective congregation around the multi-faceted crystalline Future Eyes itself spatial evidence of how easy it can be to step-into a realm of acute, limitless, and unified perception.  One of the many significant mythological and religious connotations referenced through the tree of life is how the divine manifests creation.  Through Future Eyes and immersive investigations demanding us to isolate and experience one of our senses in a new way, we can cross-over to a higher state of being and traverse an altered plane of perception – one where the dream-world and the real-world are rendered visible in one indistinguishable, perfect frame.

"11-11" inkjet print on mylar by Sharsten.   Photo: Sharsten

“11-11” inkjet print on mylar by Sharsten.
Photo: Sharsten

As the Future Eyes Foto Book Project is compiled, and as I anticipate the next installment of Fotoshows, I will continue to favor my own kaleidoscopic lenses.  To submit photos for the forthcoming Future Eyes Foto Book Project and tune into what’s on the future’s horizon visit futureeyes.org.  Our lovely friends at DUM DUM zine, an LA-based collective publishing experimental literature and art, were also in attendance and documented the evening’s extrasolar journey through this photo narrative. 

Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1
Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1