Weekly WOAH | Oct 9-15

// Thursday, Oct 9 

#tbt Scott Benzel at Public Fiction 2012 | at VSF

// Friday, Oct 10 

Expanded Cities | at Curio

// Saturday, Oct 11 

Marjorie Cameron | at MOCA PDC

Marjorie Cameron | at MOCA

// Sunday, Oct 12 

// Tuesday, Oct 14 

thank-you

Empathy/Relic #2 ( detail), 2013 |David Lucien Matheke at CSUN

// Wednesday, Oct 15 

Suzy Poling | at HRLA

Suzy Poling | at HRLA

// last-looks 

Fay Ray | at Samuel Freeman

—Follow our blog to receive an email when Weekly WOAH posts.  Drop us a line to share your event.  All images courtesy artist x venue listed.

Weekly WOAH | Oct 2-8

// Thursday, Oct 2  

Madame Freedom, at REDCAT

Madame Freedom | at REDCAT

// Friday, Oct 3

Yvonne Rainer | at The Getty

// Saturday, Oct 4

Suzy Poling | at Expanded Cities


// Sunday, Oct 5  

Matsumi Kanemitsu| at TMR

// Monday, Oct 6

// Tuesday, Oct 7

  • Stairs Into My Eyes, at The Finley, Los Feliz.
    Group show feat. Kelly Akashi, Neal Bashor, Christian Herman Cummings, Josh Mannis, Max Maslansky, & Dianna Molzan.  Curated by Dianna Molzan.  Open to the private community of tenants of the Los Feliz Villa apt bldg, exhibitions are open to the public for optimal street viewing 24/7 through the gallery’s storefront window.
    opening night | through Nov 9

// Wednesday, Oct 8

 

// last-looks  

John Knuth | at 5 Car Garage

John Knuth | at 5 Car Garage

—Follow our blog to receive an email when Weekly WOAH posts.  Drop us a line to share your event.  All images courtesy artist x venue listed.

there is something happening above us.

werkartz0

On view through Saturday at DTLA’s 10,000 sq ft. arts complex Wərkärtz is a two-man exhibition provoking questions of time, space, semantics, and the authorship of the viewing experience.  Curated by head artist liaison and Wərkärtz studio resident, Shelley Holcomb, there is nothing happening above us features new site-specific works by LA based artists Jason Burgess and Páll Haukur.  At a cross-section of semiotics, the works of these artists attain an intuitive child-like playfulness through unexpected variations in scale, material, and color, while the substance of their representations exists far beyond.

werkartz15On a horizontal plane suspended just below eye level, lies Jason Burgess’ installation The Grove, a weightless sea of multicolored foam orbs stretching across the interior space.   In slow rotation, The Grove quietly animates the adjacent backdrop of Burgess’ paintings, like extraterrestrial clouds in a hanging garden.  The usual staticity of the typical gallery setting—with work level among four white walls, framing the boxed-in viewer to encounter each work like a mirror— is cleverly eradicated throughout the exhibition.  Like Burgess’ work, Haukur’s freestanding ‘clusters’ incorporating drawing, video, sculpture, and found objects, invite discovery— drawing us up-close and to the floor.  Weaving through the subconscious maze of Haukur’s compositions, lie traces of Aristotle, Baudrillard, and a hand contemplating ‘meening.’

werkartz001Haukur’s constructs are less inert objects than material situations produced from the accumulation of codes activated through an interplay of the personal and the political; the subjective and the objective; the signifier and the signified.  Shifting through perspectives and narrative, I sift through vestiges of references to texts, images, and abjection as I move about the algorithms of Haukur’s mad scientist schematics and Burgess’ floating landscapes.  Here, in the sewage of my own private simulacrum— littered with art school academia, Clement Greenberg, and Hegel— I hear Lacan…”what is repeated, in fact, is always something that occurs…as if by chance.”  Press Release.

there is nothing happening above us
works from Jason Burgess and Páll Haukur | curated by Shelley Holcomb
on view through Saturday, June 21st

werkartz16werkartz11werkartz13

Wərkärtz / Studio / Los Angeles
767 S Alameda, Building 2 #100 | Los Angeles, CA 90021
Map | located in DTLA’s Arts District next to the American Apparel factory

2013: a ⅃ook ᗺack + whoa recap

2014
Numerology.
2+0+1+4=7
The Future.

WOAH bids adieu to MMXIII with a chronological recap of our most whoa-provoking audiovisual moments.  In light of resolutions to cross more trajectories and open more art houses– with 2014 set as a ‘7 Universal Year,’ with the number 7 alluding to greater intellectual and spiritual awakening – there’s hope for much more whoa to come in the new year.  Here’s to the 7 experiences likely to linger with us well beyond MMXIII …

LABookFair13>>LA ART BOOK FAIR presented by Printed Matter at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA.  Printed Matter presented the first-ever LA ART BOOK FAIR in February, housing over 200 international presses, booksellers, antiquarians, artists, and independent publishers for the three-day archival symposium.   Free to the public, the annual LA ART BOOK FAIR features artists’ books, catalogs, monographs, periodicals, and zines from around the globe and is companion to the NY ART BOOK FAIR, held every Fall in NYC.  Attendance all-day, every day is recommended for the LA ART BOOK FAIR 2014 just around the corner: January 31- February 2, 2014 // laartbookfair.net

>>HAPTIC & HOLISTIC STRATA by Hiroaki Umeda at Redcat.  The sold-out  HAPTIC & HOLISTIC STRATA at Redcat in February marked Tokyo-based multi-disciplinary artist Hiroaki Umeda‘s US debut.   A compelling vision of dance as multi-sensory visual installation, Umeda’s tight choreography moved synchronously to strobic projections and sonic glitches.  Within flashing patterns, scrolling videos, and explosive light particles, Umeda’s enveloping world of sound, light and movement somehow sublimated looping vertigo into transcendental equilibrium.

Luciana>>PURO DESEO by Luciana Achugar and Michael Mahalchick at Showbox L.A. Brooklyn-based choreographer Luciana Achugar performed alongside frequent collaborator Michael Mahalchick for the LA premiere of the Bessie Award-winning PURO DESEO at Showbox L.A. in March.  Evoking the occult and supernatural through sound, movement, and a moody eye for the preternatural, Achugar and Mahalchick seamlessly webbed the cavernous black-boxed theatre into an eerie, infinite– and at times nightmarish– vortex of apparitions.  For the first minutes of the performance, the viewer sat blinded in darkness (unexpected, this roughly five minutes felt like eternity), with nothing but faint sounds of bells shifting footless through space… casting the spell for the visceral and durational experience that followed.

>>WASH presented by Machine Projects As part of the Field Guide to LA Architecture series running contingent to The Getty’s PST Presents: Modern Architecture in L.A., Machine Project presented WASH, a site-specific, interactive sound installation in an indoor swimming pool.  Speakers installed above and above water channeled live and recorded sounds from Ing (John Wood and Max Markowitz), with frequencies and harmonies changing based on the viewer’s vantage point. Layers of feedback were continually added to the composition as the installation evolved throughout the afternoon.  Inviting the audience to swim through the aquatic soundscape or observe from an underground ‘viewing room’ the piece offered room for both collective and personal mediation.  Weightlessly floating and diving through underwater arpeggios, WASH, was almost as ‘immersive’ as possible.

>>THE GREY ONES by WIFE at the Downtown Independent.  WIFE is the performance trio born of LA artists Jasmine Albuquerque, Kristen Leahy, and Nina McNeely.  Premiering at TEDxSoCal, and later airing on The Creator’s Project, THE GREY ONES, juxtaposes live projection mapping with synchronized choreography to create a narrative on the evolution of time.  With an original score by Amon Tobin, THE GREY ONES evokes myth, matter, and decay; employing alternate medias to illuminate mystical phenomena and uncover collective truths.  Amazing to be apart of the team responsible for bringing this to the Downtown Independent  in August.  Presented by Phyllis NavidadINSTALL:WeHo, MKL GalleryFruitFlyLife, and WOAH.

>>Goblin: Giallo Live at the Egyptian Theatre. 40 years in the making, Halloween 2013 marked the Italian legends LA debut at the inaugural Beyond Fest.  Goblin’s live set drew from the foreboding, whispering melodies of their acclaimed horror and giallo soundtracks.  With founding members, Massimo Morante and Claudio Simonetti center stage; Suspiria 35mm on the–big–screen; and hosted at the landmark Egyptian Theatre– notorious as the site of Hollywood’s first movie premiere– this was an appropriately hyped event honoring the Maserati of film composers.  Presented by American Cinematheque and Amity, the month-long fest featured screenings, premieres, and music events especially suited to bate and satisfy the tastes of horror, fantasy, and sci-fi fans and nerds everywhere.

>>NUIT NOIRE V presented by Mount Analog A quarterly soiree presented by Highland Park record haven Mount Analog, NUIT NOIRE V welcomed Minimal Wave Founder Veronica Vasicka, duo Beau Wanzer (Mutant Beat Dance) and Elon Katz (White Car) as Streetwalker, Karl O’Connor (Regis) and Juan Mendez (Silent Servant)’s first-last-and-always performance as Sandra Plays Electronics, and the US debut of In Aeternam Vale.  At the risk of sounding like a groupie (because for IAV, I proudly am), I stuttered out ‘thank you’s’ and seized the opportunity for a hug-in-passing from the humbled, single-braided, Laurent Prot.  The magician behind a truly insane labyrinth of sounds, Prot first appeared as IAV in 1983 France.  NUIT NOIRE VI hits the LA underground February 14, make it your valentine and reserve tickets at climbmountanalog.com.

Satellites x Socialists

Published by Skydive Art Space in partnership with Temporary Art Review Sponsored by a grant from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation Coming Soon!

Satellites and Socialists: On the Fringe of the Houston Arts
Published by Skydive Art Space in partnership with Temporary Art Review
Sponsored by a grant from the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation

Houston, Texas.  A city I have been lucky to visit and engage with in recent years since the first conception of WOAH (West Oaks Art House) was born in early November 2011.  As a first-time traveller, worldwide urban-dweller and self-professed city-junkie, Houston was one of those destinations where I really didn’t know what to expect, nor did I anticipate the incredibly diverse and enigmatic artist-driven energy existing within this vast metropolis.

There are certain places where you truly do feel a collective creative consciousness brewing, where you actually see experimentation happening outside of prevalent critical discourse; ecologies where artists, activists, institutions, and cutting-edge nonprofits are evolving together to create something unparalleled outside of white walls; where possibilities are being built and new spaces and trajectories are being excavated in the process.  Art and a sense of community can be mistaken for those awkward moments when you continually run into the same semi-familiar sea of art goers at the so-and-so weekly choice art happening, usually with a crowd contingent and distinct to the venue itself: institution, gallery, or alterna-space.  That’s not to say I myself don’t partially enjoy attending and maintaining aloof anonymity at each of these art happenings.  But, my point is, in Houston, there is a cross-pollination bridging artist, museum curator, commercial gallery owner, critic, collector, nonprofit space, newcomer, and audience into one all-inclusive art community.  As an out-of-towner, feelings of inferiority initially plagued my stag attendance to varied art events, only to be quickly eradicated by the instantaneous feeling of being a key player in this creative exchange and dialogue.  I was welcomed with the feeling of being integral to the experimentation and innovation taking place within and beyond this city’s kunsthalle infrastructure –– brimming with artists, renowned institutions, and community-centric projects–– sheerly because I, too, was an artist with an idea in Houston.

With that said, I continue to be humbled to be included in the upcoming book project, Satellites and Socialists: On the Fringe of the Houston Arts, published in partnership with Temporary Art Review and edited by Founder of landmark Houston artist-run venue, Skydive Art Space, Sasha Dela.  Through an anthology of essays, interviews, mission statements, and floorplans, the book focuses on Houston as a city enabling and sustaining a variety of creative endeavors, chronicling a group of local arts organizations, that through an economy of means taking unconventional forms, envision a more perfect connection to and relationship with place.1

Included in the book: Antena Books / John Pluecker / Jen Hofer, Aurora Picture Show / Andrea Grover, Art House Rules / Nancy Zastudil, Box 13, Galveston Artist Residency / Eric Schnell, Hear Our Houston / Carrie Schneider, Hello Lucky / Teresa O’Conner, The Kenmore / Emily Sloan, Mainstreaming the Militants / Raj Mankad, Many Mini Residency / Sarrita Hunn / Ryan Thayer, The Mitchell Center for the Arts / Karen Farber, Notsuoh / Dean Liscum, Phoenix Commotion / Robert Boyd, Project Row Houses / Rick Lowe, Rice Gallery / Josh Fischer, Roadsign USA / June Woest, Settlement Goods / Jenny Morgan, Shrimp Boat Projects / Eric Leshinsky / Zach Moser, Skydive Art Space / Sasha Dela, West Oaks Art House / Sharsten Plenge, Workshop Houston and more!

We’ll keep you posted on where to read-up on the varied spaces and entities shaping Houston’s unique artscape  … Plus, you’ll want to pick-up a copy for a pair of the hand-crafted WOAH enhancement included with our textual contribution.

For more information, please contact Sasha Dela.

v i s i o n ³

Double Vision FlyerDouble Vision is a sensory experience co-created through the collaboration of three unique concept-oriented brands,  VCR (Vintage Contemporary Reconstructed), Futra, and WOAH designed to showcase emerging talent in fashion, art and music. The event will be held from 1PM – 12AM on Saturday, July 27th at Angel City Brewery in the heart of downtown LA’s arts district. Celebrating the continuous change in artistic expression, we are putting a new spin on the typical pop-up marketplace with innovative designers, an anti-fashion show, DJs, video and art installations, food trucks, and one-of-a-kind brand merchandising.

Kicking-off the day-to-night event at 1PM, VCR has curated a fashion marketplace that will feature over 20 local Los Angeles designers and vendors including: KittinhawkJfraiche, Detroit TrashPOP MURDERShred ThreadsDolly BardotDope Shit KlothingCult ClassicStone Rush JewelryJuliette GThe General StoreSPACE mallPurp7eSummer AdelineNaha ArmádyDaniel MoonNatologyCrybaby Presents, Vie Gemeos Vintage, For Eclectic Souls, Christi JaySkippedLSTN … & with more TBA!

All of the above complete with a listening booth from Mount Analog & Sweating Tapes, our favorite LA record resource & tape label respectively.

In addition to the marketplace, there will be an anti-fashion show presented as part of Galerie De L’Absurde surveying the unique collections of KittinhawkDaniel Brent NietoMARCELLA DVSI, Omega Collektiv, and Factorylook.

During the evening, the lower level of the 27,000 sq ft. venue will transform into a pop-up boutique nightclub as Futra focuses attention to the dance floor through a sophisticated line-up of diverse and seasoned DJ’s including Zernell (Grimy), Dazz Moov (Futra), Ricky Def (Futra), Reg Xelle (No Sleep, Sunday Pub Sessions), Knyphy (Futra), Phyllis Navidad (A Club Called Rhonda), Genevieve D (VSSL), EEZIR (Futra), and a DJ set by LEECH (100% Silk, Ecstasy).

Video and art installations curated by WOAH, Futra, and VCR will be showcased throughout the entirety of Double Vision, and feature emerging and established artists including Danny Perez, Future Eyes, Jil Stein, Suzy Poling, Drumcell & The Automatic Message, Scott Pagano, Nu Speed, Immanent, and Friendly Integration.

To countdown to the upcoming event, WOAH will be profiling select artists and designers in the week ahead.  But you’ll have to check back to see who’s who…

Double Vision Flyer - Featuring

∞ + time – travel = the future

Recently, I was teleported to a place outside of measurable time and space . . .  a vision of what I can hope the future to be –  where prisms bleed into sharpened infinity and space unfolds into a spectroscopic sea of kaleidoscopic forms – a place comparable only to the illusive visions encountered in dreams, delusions, and maybe LSD.

Nana Ghana defies space and time in her performance as seen through a pair of Future Eyes. Photo: Future Eyes

Nana Ghana defies space and time in her performance as seen through a pair of Future Eyes.
Photo: Future Eyes

But this was a perfect image not conceived through REM, mind-control, or psychedelics.  Instead, what I experienced was optical teleportation everyone can have with a pair of Future Eyes.  The fruition of LA based artist, writer, and inventor Brent Pearson – “Future Eyes” himself – Future Eyes are a line of handcrafted laser-cut crystal glasses that are “eyewear for the soul.”  Upon closer inspection, and confirmation from their maker, the tree of life is delicately visible and replicated on each faceted crystal lens.  These kaleidoscopic frames have acquired a following of believers, users, and future purveyors throughout LA and perhaps even worldwide (since they are made to order online).  In preparation for an upcoming book surveying the various visual manifestations and employments beheld through their vision, Future Eyes hosted a group Fotoshow at one of downtown LA’s newest artist-run, Do-It-Together complexes, The LA Fort.

nstallation by Alec Singer + Alec Rose of Indigo Orangutan. Photo: Sharsten

View of installation by Ariel Rose of Indigo Orangutan. Photo: Sharsten

For the first incarnation of the Fotoshow series, an open call for photos was conducted with each invitation complete with a complimentary pair of Future Eyes.  The result accumulated in the group Fotoshow #1  exhibition, tracing optical excursions and experimentation with Future Eyes vision.   I myself am an avid crystal and diffracted lens junkie, but this crystal is like magic . . . and the obsessive quantity of photos that ensued is evidence of how entranced I was in the ephemeral, prismatic, patterned landscapes they led me through.  Documenting the space and time travel of each participant, a selection of photos taken through Future Eyes hung the walls throughout the event’s ballad of live performances, meditations, and audiovisual stimulations.  The evening’s highlights included a guided solstice meditation led by Maria Calderon, a hypnotic performance by Nana Ghana, visuals by MYSTERR + Torie Zalben, Alec Singer, and a live act from Miss M.E (Meghan Edwards).  In addition to all of that, luminescent textiles lined the pyramidal installation pictured by Ariel Rose of Indigo Orangutan.  Part of an ongoing “creation station” project, Indigo Orangutan‘s Gospel of Genesis is “a communal offering of paints and instruments in order to stimulate imagination and creation,” inviting guests to cozy-up and paint among a sea of saturated fabric and cosmic-clad, stationed artists.

Space-rave clad artist as part of Alec Singer + Alec Rose of Indigo Orangutan's installation. Photo: Kelsey Hart for DUMDUM zine

Artist as part of Ariel Rose of Indigo Orangutan’s installation.
Photo: Kelsey Hart for DUM DUM zine

Each element of the evening seemed to be an invocation inspiring heightened sensory awareness, with the collective congregation around the multi-faceted crystalline Future Eyes itself spatial evidence of how easy it can be to step-into a realm of acute, limitless, and unified perception.  One of the many significant mythological and religious connotations referenced through the tree of life is how the divine manifests creation.  Through Future Eyes and immersive investigations demanding us to isolate and experience one of our senses in a new way, we can cross-over to a higher state of being and traverse an altered plane of perception – one where the dream-world and the real-world are rendered visible in one indistinguishable, perfect frame.

"11-11" inkjet print on mylar by Sharsten.   Photo: Sharsten

“11-11” inkjet print on mylar by Sharsten.
Photo: Sharsten

As the Future Eyes Foto Book Project is compiled, and as I anticipate the next installment of Fotoshows, I will continue to favor my own kaleidoscopic lenses.  To submit photos for the forthcoming Future Eyes Foto Book Project and tune into what’s on the future’s horizon visit futureeyes.org.  Our lovely friends at DUM DUM zine, an LA-based collective publishing experimental literature and art, were also in attendance and documented the evening’s extrasolar journey through this photo narrative. 

Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1
Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1Future Eyes Fotoshow #1

Day for Night at the New Night Gallery

A few weeks ago, after navigating clones of cubicles and browsing gallery brands at the Art Los Angeles Contemporary fair at the Barker Hangar, Arely and I ventured down the dark southern exposure of downtown to the opening of a highly anticipated after-hours….behold the new home of Night Gallery: a 6,200 square foot warehouse remastered by art space visionaire, and of Matthew Marks notoriety, architect Peter Zellner.  Acrylic window treatments by artist Yunhee Min colorize the subtle grays of the building’s unmarked, square façade.  An eclectic crowd and a few swarms of loafer-clad Bergamot gallery-goers indicate we have arrived to toast the face that is the new Night Gallery.

A giant shadow of it’s former self, previously a three-room black-walled former party-store in a Lincoln Heights strip mall, the new Night Gallery opens into a giant fortress of accented beige.  High beamed ceilings flocked with skylights allude this is a space designed for daytime viewing.  In fact, Night Gallery will no longer model their opening hours to draw the creatures of the night.  Formerly only opened Tuesdays through Saturdays 10PM-2AM, the gallery has adopted a more generic 12-7PM schedule with their relocation.  This news and a stellar article by Carol Cheh leave me fearing the same: has Night Gallery grown up?

Opening reception of the inaugural exhibition "The Mocking Hand" at the new Night Gallery.Photo: Sharsten.

Opening reception of the inaugural exhibition “The Mocking Hand” at the new Night Gallery.
Photo: Sharsten.

Night Gallery’s opt to abandon their namesake nocturnal schedule in favor or a more pedestrian friendly day operation is disappointing.  But I am hopeful.  Maybe this will inspire other venues to experiment in the social scheduling sphere–extending occasions for creative types to cultivate in the dark wee hours of the night, convening for art and not just booze or underground electro beats (though I am a fan of both alternatives).

What is most promising about the new Night Gallery is the women behind the space, Davida Nemeroff and Mieke Marple.  Nemeroff founded the original space shortly after arriving to Los Angeles in 2010, Marple joining her in 2011, with the duo announcing their decision to turn the gallery into a commercial venture thereafter.  Together, they share an ambitious vision for Night Gallery’s future programming and spatial expansion:  a four-phase plan literally moves the gallery outside-of-the-box template into a series of buildings-within-a-building structures.  Phase two, to follow, will erect a spatial replica of the former Lincoln Heights space within the new gallery; while phase three and four foretell construction of a chapel out of felt and perhaps even amass to creating social theatrical amenities like bleachers for hosting lectures, screenings, and symposiums.

Building spaces and creating new experiences within an architectural and institutional space.  That is what captivates me in hearing the future plans for Night Gallery and inspire questioning how the art gallery setting can hope to model itself in the future.  How do art spaces construct the visibilities of our individual and collective experience with art?  How do they address us physically?  How do we encounter the temporal as a condition of the spatial?

On view now in phase one is a minimal selection of work by LA artist Sean Townley.  The inaugural exhibition “The Mocking Hand” is [un]fortunately dwarfed and secondary to the architectural sublimity of the new gallery itself.  The behemoth of space in the main exhibition area alone presents the flexibility to experiment with scale, media, and relationships.  “The Mocking Hand” does little to activate the scene.  Instead, I dream of audio-visual landscapes and immersive pieces, works inviting me to the clean concrete floor, demanding me to stay and wait.  After a day at the art fair and catching an enlightening performance by Scott Benzel, I crave something a little less 2-dimensional–a total sensory experience or experiment rather than a heightened awareness of my place as viewer among these assorted, familiar, and similar forms.

Scott Benzel's performative environment "W.W.A.R./ Die Dritte Generation" (left), Photo: Sharsten; Sean Townley "Untitled" at "The Mocking Hand" (right), Photo: Night Gallery.

Scott Benzel’s performative environment “W.W.A.R./ Die Dritte Generation” (left), Photo: Sharsten; Sean Townley “Untitled” at “The Mocking Hand” (right), Photo: Night Gallery.

Perhaps the most interesting sculpture on display is in the smaller gallery adjacent to the main exhibition area.  A heavy stone mass with a brain-like protrusion is cut-out to reveal a hollow abyss beneath–I feel like I am peeking into an expensive drain or gutter as I examine what’s beneath.  Majestically lit from above, the rectangular block appears monumental and central to the subtle asymmetry of this smaller gallery.

Wandering out back into the airy space, closed doors and bare desks indicate storage and office spaces along the perimeter–the latter forming walls to enclose another space-within-a-space deemed the “private lounge area.”  Drenched in saturated blue and red lighting,  the Dario Argento-esque aesthetic coupled with the [full] bottles of booze, plush sofa, and aroma of Palo Santo draw me to wallow in this refreshingly dark, windowless cave.  It’s actually the only room reminiscent of the former Night Gallery–almost a homage to the original, compact and dimly lit lounge.  Nostalgia for the past subsides quickly, however, as I am aware there is something brewing here in this pristine new space that is much, much, bigger.  With some carefully curated finesse, and some risk-taking programs honoring it’s past as “an artist run space, for artists, by artists,” Night Gallery has the capacity to serve as a catalyst for a new generation of unorthodox art spaces and sites for institutional critique.

The private lounge at the former Night Gallery in Lincoln Heights (left), Photo: KCRW; and the current private lounge at Night Gallery's new digs (right), Photo: Sharsten.

The private lounge at the former Night Gallery in Lincoln Heights (left), Photo: KCRW; and the current private lounge at Night Gallery’s new digs (right), Photo: Sharsten.

Welcome to WOAH!

We are We Open Art Houses (WOAH), an emerging arts-service organization reanimating empty spaces through site-specific visionary projects.

WOAH aims to transform vacant storefronts, underutilized real estate, and off-the-grid open spaces into temporary art venues–showcasing creativity and reorienting pedestrian activity in unexpected places.

For property owners and space holders, WOAH offers a new opportunity to market vacancies to potential tenants by showcasing available spaces as attractive art sites.  By donating temporary space to WOAH, we house the space with art and market the pop-up gallery as part of an ongoing PR campaign.  Because WOAH strives to increase foot traffic and attract pedestrians to off-the-grid locations, we work with you to set the guidelines and build a creative program featuring a team of artists best suited to match space parameters and each property trade area.

For artists and project makers, WOAH invites you to work with us!  We believe in art and artists of all media.  Our goal is to provide unique opportunities for innovative projects to be made, seen, and heard.  If you have interest in joining WOAH on future projects, please contact us for information on how to be involved.

Do you own a WOAH worthy space to showcase?  Are you an artist interested in collaborating on future WOAH projects?  Questions about our initiatives, who we are, or want more WOAH?

We want to hear from you!

WOAH welcomes your comments and invites all interest.  Write WOAH at: weopenarthouses@gmail.com