Weekly WOAH | July 24-30

Tricia Lawless Murray Queen of Hearts at Cohen Gallery.

// Thursday, July 24

Marshtepper at Complex. Image: Jane Pain

Marshtepper at Complex.
Image: Jane Pain

// Friday, July 25

// Saturday, July 26

Ideal Territory at Cirrus Gallery.

  • KChung TV with Experimental Half-Hour at Made In LA, at the Hammer, Westwood.
    Produced through EHH, KChung Radio launches KChung TV before live audiences with episodes playing on-site during museum hours, and archived online at kchung.tv.  This week’s episode welcomes: CRYSTALLINE MORPHOLOGIES – Gabie Strong, POWER MALLET – Luke Fischbeck, and OUT OF THIS WORLD – Adam Taylor.
    12-5pm
  • Native Strategies: Issue #5 Music Issues, at LACE, Hollywood.
    Native Strategies: N (enter) S at LACE is a Native Strategies issue come to life within three-dimensional space. Throughout their residency, Native Strategies invites over 30 artists to perform in the LACE galleries and enact the process of producing a journal.
    1-2pm – Odeya Nini & Oscar Miguel Santos Boscar Bantos Sister Mantos)
    2-3pm – Dorian Wood & Claire Cronin.
  • Ideal Territory, at Cirrus Gallery, DTLA.
    Group show of works obliquely considering ‘territory’ itself—as domain, history, narrative, and site of comparison.  Curated by Elan Greenwald.
    Opening reception: 6-8pm
    Through Aug 16
  • The Cartographer, at Charlie James Gallery, Chinatown.
    Group show extending abstracted ideas of mapping. Works by Charles Gaines, Steve Roden, Joshua Segura, Alise Spinella, Clarissa Tossin, Cody Trepte, and Samira Yamin.  Curated by Alise Spinella.
    Opening reception: 7pm
    Through Aug 30
  • Instagram Mini-Marathon with Hans Ulrich Obrist, at Million Dollar Theater, DTLA.
    Panel with artists and insta-purveyors on how the virtual space pace provides for extending ideas and practices.  Moderated by Hans Ulrich Obrist.  Feat guests: boychild, Simon Castets, Meg Cranston, Michel Gaubert, Alex Israel, Niko Karamyan, Rachel Lor, John Ennis, Kevin McGarry, Ryder Ripps, & Frances Stark.
    7:30pm
  • Mike Kelley Closing Party, at The Geffen Contemporary at MOCA, DTLA.
    MOCA and the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts celebrate the closing of the exhibition.  Feat. live DJ sets by Psychopop, Friendzone, FUXUS, Dangel xxx, Jason Yates, and mr.imd with food trucks, cash bar & more!  Co-hosted by Opening Ceremony.
    6-10pm

    Adam Ferriss, Crystal Display, at Ghostings 1-Year.

    Adam Ferriss, Crystal Display (excerpt),  at Ghosting’s 1-Year.

  • Ghosting 1 Year Anniversary!, at Ghosting.tv HQ, DTLA.
    Videos:Andrew Benson, Ian Cheng, Jen Stark, Johnny Woods, Adam Ferriss, & many more; Music: Chrome Canyon, Telecaves, KrOn; Games: LA Game Space; 16mm films: Lost & Found Film Club; Food: Brun’s Creole Soul Kitchen
    8pm-2am
Patrick Nagel.

Patrick Nagel at 2A.

// Sunday, July 27

Mike Kelley, GET THERE!

Mike Kelley, GET THERE!

// Monday, July 28

// Tuesday, July 29

David Hendren at 5  Car Garage.

David Hendren at 5 Car Garage.

// Wednesday, July 30

// last-looks 

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Weekly WOAH | July 17-23

Image: J J Steele. Chiara Giovando at Issue#5 at LACE.

// Thursday, July 17

throwback Korakrit Arunanondchai: The Zoo (Avatar).  New installation opens at The Mistake Room.

// Friday, July 18

// Saturday, July 19

Images: Fredrik Nilsen (co-founder of LAFMS), performs as Extended Organ at MOCA.

Anita Bunn’s 9 tone lithographs at Offramp Gallery.

// Sunday, July 20

// Monday, July 21

// Tuesday, July 22

// Wednesday, July 23

// last-looks 

Anthony Samaniego at Slow Culture.

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Weekly WOAH | July 10-16

// Thursday, July 10 

In The Flesh

In The Flesh at Crowded House.

// Friday, July 11

Experimental Half-Hour at Made In LA.

// Saturday, July 12

// Sunday, July 13

// Monday, July 14

// Tuesday, July 15

Lost & Found Film Club presents Naughty Bits

// Wednesday, July 16

  • Lost & Found Film Club: NAUGHTY BITS, at Cinefamily, West Hollywood.
    Awkward teens, boxing burlesque queens, animated cut-paper penises, and feline fanciers and silly smut… Plus 35mm nudies compiled by 60’s Hollywood projectionists in this series of strange and sticky shorts that are as arousing as they are entertaining.
    10:30pm

// last-looks 

Image: Katie Shapiro | at Stephen Cohen.

—Subscribe to our blog to receive an e-mail when new #whoa posts.  Drop us a line to share your event.  Images courtesy the artist or venue.  99.9% of these events are FREE or hosted by donation-based, not-for-profits—meaning your $ enables the continuation of their happening.  ∞Support them∞

Day for Night at the New Night Gallery

A few weeks ago, after navigating clones of cubicles and browsing gallery brands at the Art Los Angeles Contemporary fair at the Barker Hangar, Arely and I ventured down the dark southern exposure of downtown to the opening of a highly anticipated after-hours….behold the new home of Night Gallery: a 6,200 square foot warehouse remastered by art space visionaire, and of Matthew Marks notoriety, architect Peter Zellner.  Acrylic window treatments by artist Yunhee Min colorize the subtle grays of the building’s unmarked, square façade.  An eclectic crowd and a few swarms of loafer-clad Bergamot gallery-goers indicate we have arrived to toast the face that is the new Night Gallery.

A giant shadow of it’s former self, previously a three-room black-walled former party-store in a Lincoln Heights strip mall, the new Night Gallery opens into a giant fortress of accented beige.  High beamed ceilings flocked with skylights allude this is a space designed for daytime viewing.  In fact, Night Gallery will no longer model their opening hours to draw the creatures of the night.  Formerly only opened Tuesdays through Saturdays 10PM-2AM, the gallery has adopted a more generic 12-7PM schedule with their relocation.  This news and a stellar article by Carol Cheh leave me fearing the same: has Night Gallery grown up?

Opening reception of the inaugural exhibition "The Mocking Hand" at the new Night Gallery.Photo: Sharsten.

Opening reception of the inaugural exhibition “The Mocking Hand” at the new Night Gallery.
Photo: Sharsten.

Night Gallery’s opt to abandon their namesake nocturnal schedule in favor or a more pedestrian friendly day operation is disappointing.  But I am hopeful.  Maybe this will inspire other venues to experiment in the social scheduling sphere–extending occasions for creative types to cultivate in the dark wee hours of the night, convening for art and not just booze or underground electro beats (though I am a fan of both alternatives).

What is most promising about the new Night Gallery is the women behind the space, Davida Nemeroff and Mieke Marple.  Nemeroff founded the original space shortly after arriving to Los Angeles in 2010, Marple joining her in 2011, with the duo announcing their decision to turn the gallery into a commercial venture thereafter.  Together, they share an ambitious vision for Night Gallery’s future programming and spatial expansion:  a four-phase plan literally moves the gallery outside-of-the-box template into a series of buildings-within-a-building structures.  Phase two, to follow, will erect a spatial replica of the former Lincoln Heights space within the new gallery; while phase three and four foretell construction of a chapel out of felt and perhaps even amass to creating social theatrical amenities like bleachers for hosting lectures, screenings, and symposiums.

Building spaces and creating new experiences within an architectural and institutional space.  That is what captivates me in hearing the future plans for Night Gallery and inspire questioning how the art gallery setting can hope to model itself in the future.  How do art spaces construct the visibilities of our individual and collective experience with art?  How do they address us physically?  How do we encounter the temporal as a condition of the spatial?

On view now in phase one is a minimal selection of work by LA artist Sean Townley.  The inaugural exhibition “The Mocking Hand” is [un]fortunately dwarfed and secondary to the architectural sublimity of the new gallery itself.  The behemoth of space in the main exhibition area alone presents the flexibility to experiment with scale, media, and relationships.  “The Mocking Hand” does little to activate the scene.  Instead, I dream of audio-visual landscapes and immersive pieces, works inviting me to the clean concrete floor, demanding me to stay and wait.  After a day at the art fair and catching an enlightening performance by Scott Benzel, I crave something a little less 2-dimensional–a total sensory experience or experiment rather than a heightened awareness of my place as viewer among these assorted, familiar, and similar forms.

Scott Benzel's performative environment "W.W.A.R./ Die Dritte Generation" (left), Photo: Sharsten; Sean Townley "Untitled" at "The Mocking Hand" (right), Photo: Night Gallery.

Scott Benzel’s performative environment “W.W.A.R./ Die Dritte Generation” (left), Photo: Sharsten; Sean Townley “Untitled” at “The Mocking Hand” (right), Photo: Night Gallery.

Perhaps the most interesting sculpture on display is in the smaller gallery adjacent to the main exhibition area.  A heavy stone mass with a brain-like protrusion is cut-out to reveal a hollow abyss beneath–I feel like I am peeking into an expensive drain or gutter as I examine what’s beneath.  Majestically lit from above, the rectangular block appears monumental and central to the subtle asymmetry of this smaller gallery.

Wandering out back into the airy space, closed doors and bare desks indicate storage and office spaces along the perimeter–the latter forming walls to enclose another space-within-a-space deemed the “private lounge area.”  Drenched in saturated blue and red lighting,  the Dario Argento-esque aesthetic coupled with the [full] bottles of booze, plush sofa, and aroma of Palo Santo draw me to wallow in this refreshingly dark, windowless cave.  It’s actually the only room reminiscent of the former Night Gallery–almost a homage to the original, compact and dimly lit lounge.  Nostalgia for the past subsides quickly, however, as I am aware there is something brewing here in this pristine new space that is much, much, bigger.  With some carefully curated finesse, and some risk-taking programs honoring it’s past as “an artist run space, for artists, by artists,” Night Gallery has the capacity to serve as a catalyst for a new generation of unorthodox art spaces and sites for institutional critique.

The private lounge at the former Night Gallery in Lincoln Heights (left), Photo: KCRW; and the current private lounge at Night Gallery's new digs (right), Photo: Sharsten.

The private lounge at the former Night Gallery in Lincoln Heights (left), Photo: KCRW; and the current private lounge at Night Gallery’s new digs (right), Photo: Sharsten.